Benefits of drinking water

All living organisms need water to survive. Not only does water support essential physical functions, it also provides vital nutrients that the body does not produce on its own. While most people in the United States have access to clean drinking water, many people choose bottled mineral water for its perceived purity and potential health benefits. How does mineral water compare with regular water? Based on the current evidence, the differences are not very significant. Both types contain minerals and undergo some form of processing. However, by definition, mineral water must contain a certain amount of minerals, and the bottling process takes place at the source. We discuss the differences between tap water and mineral water below.

Tap water
The water in household taps comes either from surface or underground sources. In the U.S., tap water must meet the Safe Drinking Water Act standards established by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These regulations limit the number of contaminants present in water supplied to homes. Public water suppliers move water from its source to treatment plants, where it undergoes chemical disinfection. The clean water ultimately gets delivered to households through a system of underground pipes. Tap water contains added minerals, including calcium, magnesium, and potassium. Hard tap water has higher mineral contents, which some consider more healthful. However, minerals in hard water form deposits that can corrode pipes or restrict the flow. Also, despite the efforts of public water suppliers, contaminants from rusted or leaking pipes can pollute drinking water.

Mineral water
Mineral water comes from natural underground reservoirs and mineral springs, giving it a higher mineral content than tap water. According to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), mineral water must contain at least 250 parts per million of total dissolved solids. The FDA prohibit these manufacturers from adding minerals to their products.

Minerals that are often present in mineral water include: calcium, magnesium, potassium, sodium, bicarbonate, iron, zinc, Unlike tap water, mineral water is bottled at the source. Some people prefer mineral water due to its perceived purity and the lack of chemical disinfection treatments.

A source of magnesium
Both bottled mineral water and tap water can be sources of magnesium. This nutrient plays essential roles in regulating blood pressure, blood glucose levels, and nerve function. Some sources have more or less magnesium than others. The amount of magnesium in water can range from 1 milligram per liter (mg/l) to more than 120 mg/l, depending on the source.

The daily recommended allowance for magnesium is as follows:
310–320 mg for adult females
400–420 mg for adult males
According to the Office of Dietary Supplements, most people in the U.S. consume less than the recommended amount of magnesium.

Below are some symptoms of magnesium deficiency:
loss of appetite
fatigue
muscle weakness
nausea and vomiting